• Antenna and Wireless Technologies for Safeguarding Australia

    • Dr Alex Zelinsky
      • Chief Defence Scientist, Defence Science and Technology Organization (DSTO), Australia
      • Abstract
        • Antenna technology is critical for defence and national security. Chief Defence Scientist Dr Alex Zelinsky outlines cutting edge defence applications of smart antenna technology for surveillance, communications, electronic warfare and direction finding.  The proliferation of broadband wireless communication technology poses new challenges that require antennas to adapt to changing operating conditions.  DST Group has a long history of radar research and is continuing to find innovative applications in collaboration with international partners and Australian industry and universities.  The presentation reflects on the traits of an ideal antenna and what’s possible in the near future. 
      • Biography
        • Dr Alex Zelinsky was appointed Chief Defence Scientist and head of Defence Science and Technology Organisation (now Defence Science and Technology Group) in March 2012.Before joining Defence he was Group Executive for Information Sciences at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and Director of CSIRO’s Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) Centre.
        • Dr Zelinsky was Chief Executive Officer and co-founder of Seeing Machines, a high-technology company developing computer vision systems. The company is listed on the London Stock Exchange and was a start-up from the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia, where Dr Zelinsky was Professor of Systems Engineering.
        • Dr Zelinsky researched in robotics and computer vision at the AIST Electrotechnical Laboratory in Japan and has taught and conducted research in computer science at the University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. He started his career as a Systems Engineer with BHP Steel International.
        • Dr Zelinsky has extensively advised Federal and State governments in Australia, including as a member of the Australian Government's Defence Industry Innovation Board. He has served on the advisory panels to the Australian Research Centre (ARC) Centre for Vision Science, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Autonomous Systems and currently the ARC Centre of Excellence for Robotic Vision.
        • Dr Zelinsky completed his Bachelor of Mathematical Sciences (Honours) and Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Wollongong, NSW.
        • In 2009, Engineers Australia named Dr Zelinsky Professional Engineer of the Year (Sydney Division) and he has been included in Engineers Australia’s list of the 100 most influential engineers since that year. He subsequently received the Engineers Australia M A Sargent Medal 2015 - the most prestigious award made by the College of Electrical Engineers. In 2013 he was awarded the prestigious Pearcey Medal, the ICT industry’s premier prize for lifetime achievement.

 


 

  • Recent Medical Applications of Antennas 

    • Prof Koichi Ito
      •  Center for Frontier Medical Engineering, Chiba University, Japan
      • Abstract
        • In recent years, various types of medical and healthcare applications of antennas have widely been investigated and reported. Typical recent applications include:(1) Information / Wireless power transmission: - Wearable or Implantable vital data sensor / monitor - Wireless telemedicine / Mobile health system - Wireless capsule endoscopy(2) Diagnosis: - High intensity MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) - Microwave CT (Computed Tomography) for cancer detection - Wireless sleep monitor / ECG (electrocardiogram) monitor(3) Treatment: - Thermal therapy (hyperthermia, ablation, etc) - Wireless brain stimulator - Surgical device (coagulation device, microwave knife, etc)In this presentation, some practical medical applications of antennas which have been studied in our laboratory are introduced. Firstly, a wearable dual-mode antenna for vital data monitoring systems is presented. A key technology for the antenna is body-centric wireless communications. Secondly, an X-band antenna for a microwave sleep monitor is demonstrated with human-body phantom experiments. A "dynamic" phantom played an important role for the study. Thirdly, after a brief description of thermal therapy and microwave heating, a coaxial-slot antenna and an array applicator composed of several coaxial-slot antennas for minimally invasive microwave thermal therapy are overviewed. A few results of actual clinical trials by use of coaxial-slot antennas are demonstrated from a technical point of view. Then, as a new therapeutic application of coaxial-slot antennas, intracavitary hyperthermia for bile duct carcinoma is briefly introduced. Finally, a few different types of surgical devices using high power microwave energy, including a new coagulation device which can detect the complete coagulation, are introduced. Heating characteristics of such microwave surgical devices are evaluated by numerical calculation as well as some experiments using phantoms, meat and animals.
      • Biography
        • Koichi Ito was born in Nagoya, Japan, and received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Chiba University, Chiba, Japan, in 1974 and 1976, respectively, and the D.E. degree from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan, in 1985, all in electrical engineering. From 1976 to 1979, he was a Research Associate at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. From 1979 to 1989, he was a Research Associate at Chiba University. From 1989 to 1997, he was an Associate Professor at the Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chiba University. From 1997 to 2003, he was a Professor at the Department, and is currently a Professor at the Center for Frontier Medical Engineering, Chiba University. From 2005 to 2009, he was Deputy Vice-President for Research, Chiba University. From 2008 to 2009, he was Vice-Dean of the Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University. Since April 2009, he has been appointed as Director of Research Center for Frontier Medical Engineering, Chiba University. In 1989, 1994, and 1998, he visited the University of Rennes I, France, as an Invited Professor. He has been appointed as Adjunct Professor to the University of Indonesia since 2010 and Visiting Professor to the Xidian University, China, since 2014.
        • His main research interests include analysis and design of compact antennas for mobile communications, research on evaluation of the interaction between electromagnetic fields and the human body by use of numerical and experimental phantoms, microwave antennas for medical applications such as cancer treatment, and antenna systems for body-centric wireless communications.
        • Professor Ito is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of the Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers (IEICE) of Japan, a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Bioelectromagnetics Society (BEMS), the Institute of Image Information and Television Engineers of Japan (ITE) and the Japanese Society for Thermal Medicine. He served as Chair of the Technical Group on Radio and Optical Transmissions, ITE, from 1997 to 2001, Chair of the Technical Committee on Human Phantoms for Electromagnetics, IEICE, from 1998 to 2006, Chair of the Technical Committee on Antennas and Propagation, IEICE, from 2009 to 2011, Chair of the IEEE AP-S Japan Chapter from 2001 to 2002, Vice-Chair of the 2007 International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation (ISAP2007), General Chair of the 2008 IEEE International Workshop on Antenna Technology (iWAT2008), Co-Chair of ISAP2008, an AdCom member for the IEEE AP-S from 2007 to 2009, an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation from 2004 to 2010, a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE AP-S from 2007 to 2011, General Chair of ISAP2012 and a member of the Board of Directors, BEMS, from 2010 to 2013. He currently serves as Chair of the IEEE AP-S Committee on Man and Radiation (COMAR) and a Councilor to the Asian Society of Hyperthermic Oncology (ASHO). He has been appointed as a member of the IEEE Life Sciences New Initiative (LSNI) Project Team since 2011. He has been elected as a delegate to the European Association on Antennas and Propagation (EurAAP) since 2012 and Chair of Commission K, Japan National Committee of URSI (International Union of Radio Science) since 2014.

 


 

  • The Mesmerizing Evolution of Reflector Antennas in Diverse Applications: A Passage from the Ancient Past to the Renaissance and the Present 

    •  Prof Yahya Rahmat-Samii
      • Distinguished Professor and Northrop Grumman Chair in Electrical Engineering / Electromagnetics, UCLA, USA
      • Abstract
        • A casual Internet search yields over one million web sites associated with the phrase “reflector antenna”. This author was so fascinated by a typical reflector antenna shape that when he designed the winning IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society Logo he used a rendition of a reflector antenna in the logo artwork. This logo design now appears on thousands of publication materials related to the IEEE antenna publications, symposia flyers and books, etc. This depiction of an antenna is the most recognized form of any antenna by the general public. Throughout the history of mankind, the reflector antenna has seen a wide range of applications since among other antenna configurations it provides the highest gain, widest bandwidth, and best angular resolutions at the lowest costs. Simply stating, the primary role of a reflector antenna is to confine or radiate most of the electromagnetic energy over its aperture into a focal plane in receive mode or radiate to the far fields for communication or energy transfer in transmit mode. Typical reflector antennas use conic sections, the parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, and sphere, to either focus or efficiently radiate electromagnetic waves. Reflector antennas are typically categorized according to radiation pattern type, reflector surface type, and feed type. Pencil-beam reflectors are the most popular and are commonly used in point-to-point microwave communications and telemetry, since they yield the maximum gain and typically their beam directions are fixed at the time of antenna installation. In satellite communication systems, the uplink pencil-beam is typically steered by moving the reflector, or steering over a limited range using the feed. Recent generations of satellite reflectors have produced other popular types of radiation pattern classifications: contour (shaped) beams and multiple beams. These applications require reflectors with improved off-axis beam characteristics and non-standard conical shapes. Demand for high performance large reflector antennas for space applications have necessitated the development of various deployable concepts, such as, mesh and inflatable designs. Radio astronomy and deep space communications have also resulted into fascinating reflector antenna developments and engineering. In this keynote talk, the development of reflector antennas, from the ancient past to the Renaissance to the present, is reviewed in a concise and novel fashion, along with inferences to present and future developments. The material presented in this overview talk is the summarized version of many journal and conference papers and book chapters co-authored by the author and his contributions to the original designs of many currently functioning communications, remote sensing, and radar antenna systems.
      • Biography
        • Yahya Rahmat-Samii is a Distinguished Professor, holder of the Northrop-Grumman Chair in electromagnetics, member of the US National Academy of Engineering (NAE), winner of the 2011 IEEE Electromagnetics Award and the former chairman of the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Before joining UCLA, he was a Senior Research Scientist at Caltech/NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Dr. Rahmat-Samii was the 1995 President of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society and 2009-2011President of the United States National Committee (USNC) of the International Union of Radio Science (URSI).  He has also served as an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer presenting lectures internationally. Dr. Rahmat-Samii is a Fellow of the IEEE, AMTA and ACES. Dr. Rahmat-Samii has authored and co-authored nearly 1000 technical journal articles and conference papers and has written over 35 book chapters and five books. Dr. Rahmat-Samii has received numerous awards, including the 1992 and 1995 Wheeler Best Application Prize Paper Award for his papers published in the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Transactions, 1999 University of Illinois ECE Distinguished Alumni Award, the IEEE Third Millennium Medal, AMTA’2000 Distinguished Achievement Award, 2001 recipient of an Honorary Doctorate Cassa from the University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain, 2001 Foreign Membership of the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts, 2002 Technical Excellence Award from JPL, 2005 URSI Booker Gold Medal, 2007 Chen-To Tai Distinguished Educator Award of the IEEE AP-S, 2009 IEEE AP-S Distinguished Achievement Award, 2010 UCLA School of Engineering Lockheed Martin Excellence in Teaching Award, 2011 UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award, 2012 elected fellow of the Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society (ACES) and 2015 Distinguished Engineering Achievement Awards of the Engineers’ Council. His research contributions cover diverse areas of modern electromagnetics and antennas spanning from small medical antennas to large space deployable antennas. Prof. Rahmat-Samii is the designer of the IEEE AP-S logo which is displayed on all IEEE AP-S publications.

 


 

  • Antennas and Quasi-optics For Space Terahertz Instrumentation

    • Dr Peter de Maagt
      • European Space Agency
      • Abstract
        • This paper will give an overview of some of the antennas and quasioptical components that are used in space instruments. Herschel and Planck observatories will be used as an example to demonstrate the hurdles that had to be overcome. Several Earth observation instruments and astronomical missions which use millimetre and submillimetre wavebands, have been developed or are being planned by ESA. These instruments have many commonalities in their design and construction techniques. One of the issues that the above missions have in common is that they require state-of-the-art technology to achieve their ambitious goals; the highest resolution, the highest sensitivity, the highest frequency of operation. Although technology is advancing at a rapid pace in this frequency range, the requirements for these instruments go well beyond those of related existing (sub)millimetre wave instruments. This has resulted in the need for new antenna configurations and in the refinement of existing configurations and technologies for top performance. Furthermore, it has to be recognized that there are also no standards or calibration reference sources in this field which complicates the procedures to verify the RF performance under flight conditions. Antenna performance is a critical aspect in millimetre-wave and submillimetre-wave limb sounding, since it determines the resolution and accuracy with which the concentration profiles of atmospheric species can be retrieved. Antenna performance is also a critical aspect of millimetre-wave and submillimetre-wave astronomical missions. For pointed observatories, which seek to map point-like or not very extended objects, the emphasis is then on beam efficiency and the control of main beam shapes. For survey missions, the level of far side lobes also becomes very important and in some cases (such as PLANCK) this exerts a critical influence on the success of the mission. The paper will discuss a range of THz applications and will present the antenna, their feed assemblies and quasi-optical components and systems that are utilised for the frequency region. It will also highlight the procedure that had to be adopted in order to verify RF performance under flight conditions. ESA's Herschel and Planck observatories will be used as an example to highlight some of the hurdles that had to be overcome for verification of flight-performance.. Some scientific results that have been obtained from the recent missions will also be shown. Upcoming mission will be discussed.
      • Biography
        • Peter de Maagt received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, in 1988 and 1992, respectively, both in electrical engineering. In the period 1992/1993 he was station manager and scientist for an INTELSAT propagation project in Surabaya, Indonesia. He is currently with the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC), European Space Agency, Noordwijk, The Netherlands. His research interests are in the are of millimetre and submillimeter-wave reflector and planar integrated antennas, quasioptics, electromagnetic bandgap antennas, and millimetre- and submillimetre-wave components. He spent summer 2010 as a Visiting Research Scientist at the Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa. Dr. de Maagt was corecipient of the H. A. Wheeler Award of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society for the Best Applications Paper of 2001 and 2008. He was granted an ESA Award for Innovation in 2002, and an ESA award for Corporate Team Achievements for the Herschel and Planck Program in 2010. He was co-recipient of the LAPC 2006 and IWAT 2007 best paper award. He served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on antennas and propagation from 2004–2010, and was Co-Guest Editor of the November 2007 Special Issue on Optical and Terahertz Antenna Technology. He was also a member of the IEEE Benelux chapter and IET (formerly IEE) Antenna and Propagation Professional Network Executive Team between 2002 and 2008.